Midcentury Modern Homes Are Hot

Homes built in the midcentury modern style continue to fetch ever-increasing prices from preservationists and others who love their rich woods and minimalist design.

The Kaufmann Housein Palm Springs, Calif., designed by Richard Neutra in 1946, brought $16.8 million with commission last week at a Christie’s auction.

Marc Porter, Christie’s president in America, said the buyer, whom he declined to name, exercised an option to purchase an orchard adjacent to the property for an additional $2.1 million that includes three cacti that were a present from Frank Lloyd Wright to original owner Edgar Kaufmann, Pittsburgh department store magnate, on his first visit to the home.

The 1960 Esherick Housein Chestnut Hill, Pa. — one of the few private residences designed by the influential Louis Kahn — is part of a contemporary-design auction on May 18 at Richard Wright in Chicago. It is expected to bring $2 million or $3 million.

Many of these homes aren’t very livable. For instance, the Esherick House has only one bedroom and the kitchen. The five-bedroom Kaufmann House comes with restrictions that bar its new owner from making any structural changes.

Source: The New York Times, Carol Vogen (05/14/), and Newsweek, Cathleen McGuigan (05/19/)

Nia Fact: I love midcentury modern- and am a collector of the furniture….however looking at the price tag of these homes, I may need to find a new hobby.

Author: niaknowles

Real Estate Broker, Christian Yogi, Mother of three

One thought on “Midcentury Modern Homes Are Hot”

  1. the pricetag can be intimidating on some of these homes built by noted architects however there are affordable mid-century modern homes that can be found across the country (in some instances, at or below the value of their more traditional counterparts). The key is to look for homes that were INSPIRED by the likes of Frank L. Wright, Esherick, Neutra, etc. BUT actually designed and built by a lesser known architect and builder.

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