The Grounds Coffeehouse…

Has an amazing Quilt exhibit on display. Now is your time to begin your collection- there are very skilled beginning quilters with large items at affordable prices!

Artists: O.V. Brantley, Aleathia Chisolm, Nancy DeCreny Franklin,Julia J. Glover, Aisha Lumumba, Belinda Pedroso, Paulette Strain

I have my eye on a few, “Stepping Out”, “Queen of Everything”, “Black Butterfly”,”Roses are Red”… but obviously I have expensive taste since these cost the most….however, they are worth every cent!

McCain Wants to Buy Up Bad Mortgages

Republican presidential candidate John McCain proposed during Tuesday night’s debate using $300 billion of the $700 billion of the financial bailout money to buy up bad home mortgages, instead of rescuing the financial markets.

“I would order the secretary of the Treasury to immediately buy up the bad home-loan mortgages in America and renegotiate at the new value of those homes at the diminished values of those homes and let people be able to make those payments and stay in their homes,” he said.

Democratic nominee Barack Obama last month sounded a similar theme, proposing that the government consider taking such a step.

But McCain’s approach was far more unequivocal.

A background paper provided by the McCain campaign said the plan “could be implemented quickly as a result of the authorities provided in the stabilization bill, the recent housing bill, and the U.S. government’s conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.”

It was unclear, either from McCain’s remarks or from the backup materials provided by the campaign, how such a massive plan would be administered. Though McCain, a budget hawk and critic of rising federal spending, did concede one point. “Is it expensive? Yes,” he said.

Source: The Associated Press, Jim Kuhnhenn

Employer-Assisted Housing Can Be the Answer

Rising home prices, increased housing costs, and today’s tightened mortgage market have put homeownership out of reach for many working families.

In fact, nearly 40 percent of Americans believe there is a shortage of available affordable housing, according to a recent survey by the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®.

The survey also found eight out of 10 Americans believe that having enough money for down payment and closing costs is an obstacle to purchasing a home. Another 69 percent think it’s difficult to find a home that they both like and can afford.

To promote more affordable housing solutions for the nation’s workforce, hundreds of housing advocates from across the country are coming together Monday for the first-ever conference on employer-assisted housing benefits.

“Employer-Assisted Housing: Bring Workers Home” is taking place in Chicago at the InterContinental Hotel. The conference will highlight case studies of successful EAH programs from public and private sector employers and local governments and allow key stakeholders to connect and explore opportunities to work together to help increase awareness about EAH benefits.

“REALTORS® build communities and care about the lack of housing opportunities available to America’s low- to moderate-income working families, many of whom can’t find affordable housing near their workplace,” says NAR President Dick Gaylord.

The conference keynote speakers are national housing consultants Beverly Barnes and Beth Marcus; Sharon H. Douglas, vice president of human resources and chief people person, Aflac; and Carl Guardino, Silicon Valley Leadership Group.

NAR is sponsoring the event in partnership with the Chicago Association of REALTORS®, Illinois Association of REALTORS ®, Metropolitan Planning Council, National Association of Counties, National Housing Conference and the U.S. Conference of Mayors.

Source: NAR

Being an Architect..

at heart. I can appreciate the style of this home. This is in OLD FOURTH WARD…  look at MLS##:3792479 for additional photos and list price..

Architect Coach:

You know them by their odd-sized and often tall windows, their lack of ornamentation, and their unusual mixtures of wall materials–stone, brick, and wood, for instance. Architects designed Contemporary-style homes (in the Modern family) between 1950 and 1970, and created two versions: the flat-roof and gabled types. The latter is often characterized by exposed beams. Both breeds tend to be one-story tall and were designed to incorporate the surrounding landscape into their overall look.