Historic Home on Georgia Ave, Macon GA

xl_14721_964_front_of_house

Home prices in Macon, GA are nothing to laugh about- List Price for this 1905 “Georgian Colonial”  $1.5mil. “This building boasts 9,200 s/f over three floors with a loft and a elevator. ”  

1905 Craftsman in Hogansville, GA

….where is Hogansville?  Lovely home 5bed,4.5baths- 5000sq ft! This home has a HUGE carriage house in the back..

xl_17542_house_front_1

More details/price HERE

Residential Style- Not your typical Shotgun

FMLS#3756417  949 Beecher Street, Atlanta GA 30310 List price 450K

Architecture Guide:

Tradition has it that if you fire a shotgun through the front doorway of this long, narrow home, the bullet will exit directly through the back door. The style is characterized by a single story with a gabled roof. Shotguns are usually only one room wide, with each room leading directly into the next. Exterior features include a vent on the front gable and a full front porch trimmed with gingerbread brackets and ornamentation. Mail-order plans and parts for shotgun homes were widely available at the turn-of-the-century, making it a popular, low-cost structure to build in both urban and suburban settings

Being an Architect..

at heart. I can appreciate the style of this home. This is in OLD FOURTH WARD…  look at MLS##:3792479 for additional photos and list price..

Architect Coach:

You know them by their odd-sized and often tall windows, their lack of ornamentation, and their unusual mixtures of wall materials–stone, brick, and wood, for instance. Architects designed Contemporary-style homes (in the Modern family) between 1950 and 1970, and created two versions: the flat-roof and gabled types. The latter is often characterized by exposed beams. Both breeds tend to be one-story tall and were designed to incorporate the surrounding landscape into their overall look.

 

Architecture Coach:Queen Anne

A sub-style of the late Victorian era, Queen Anne is a collection of coquettish detailing and eclectic materials. Steep cross-gabled roofs, towers, and vertical windows are all typical of a Queen Anne home. Inventive, multistory floor plans often include projecting wings, several porches and balconies, and multiple chimneys with decorative chimney pots.

Wooden “gingerbread” trim in scrolled and rounded “fish-scale” patterns frequently graces gables and porches. Massive cut stone foundations are typical of period houses. Created by English architect Richard Norman Shaw, the style was popularized after the Civil War by architect Henry Hobson Richardson and spread rapidly, especially in the South and West.

Information and photo taken from www.Realtor.org