Home Owner Satisfaction Remains High

Daily Real Estate News | Monday, January 23, 2012

Nearly three out of every four home owners say they are satisfied with their purchase – and the No. 1 reason for their satisfaction is pride they feel about owning a home, according to HomeGain’s 2012 National Home Ownership Survey.
In addition to pride, home owners also said they enjoy the freedom and control they have to make improvement and upgrades to their home.
Of the 1,400 home owners surveyed nationwide, satisfaction was found to be highest in the Northeast at 77 percent, followed by the Southeast at 73 percent, the West at 71 percent, and the Midwest at 68 percent.
“The HomeGain 2012 National Home Ownership satisfaction survey shows in spite of declines in the values of homes nationwide, satisfaction among home owners remains high at 72 percent,” said Louis Cammarosano, general manager of HomeGain.
Of the 28 percent of surveyed home owners who indicated they are dissatisfied, price depreciation was cited as the primary cause. Other reasons for their discontent include property taxes, homeowner association fees, and maintenance and repairs.
Noteworthy survey statistics:
  • Home owners who paid less than $75,000 for their home were the most satisfied at 77 percent.
  • Home owners who paid more than $800,000 were least satisfied at 69 percent.
  • Buyers who purchased a home via short sale had the highest satisfaction rate at 83 percent, followed by foreclosed home buyers at 79 percent.
  • New-home buyers had a satisfaction rate of 73 percent, and existing-home buyers had a satisfaction rate of 71 percent.
  • Home owners ages 55-65 were the most satisfied at 76 percent. Home owners between 18 and 25 had the lowest satisfaction rate at 45 percent.
By Erica Christoffer, REALTOR® Magazine

Is Renting Still the Better Deal?

“Renting is the cheaper way to go!” Is this widely believed “fact” still true?  According to the latest research, renters spend 5% more on housing than home owners.  To find out why it’s more logical to just buy a home, rather than rent, and how the times have changed, visit Renters Outspend Owners on Housing.

Small Cool…

I think my house is too big.
I know I could never imagine thinking this, when I was in my smaller ranch home but, while sweeping the upstairs hall and discovering dust balls in places I haven’t been in weeks, I felt drained.
Not drained from the amount of work I had to do to keep the house in order, but drained in the creativity department.  Is there such a thing as having too much space for “stuff” that it actually stifles our creativity?
I don’t know, but I’m feeling it.  When I was in the ranch home, I remember being bold and daring.  I painted the dining room a deep chocolate-brown, I used baskets for storage and seats.  I recreated shelves and turned nooks into libraries.  In the living room, I painted one wall aqua  and on the other  white with a huge freehand aqua flower.
I hung curtains all over and weekly rearranged furniture to give each room new life.  The bold YELLOW kitchen always felt spicy and my red bathroom fun. I miss the ME, in that home.
Now with a little over 3,000 sq. ft, I feel…afraid!
I’m afraid to make any paint decisions that may stand out and not flow with the “theme” of the home…?? What theme? I still have yet to define my “theme” but don’t’ want to make any moves out of fear of potentially messing whatever it WILL BE, up.  Insanity!
I know and always tell clients, “Painting is the easiest, most affordable way to make a change. If you don’t like it- paint it AGAIN!”
So why am I not following my advice?
Today, I had to revisit a few good websites and books that always inspire and motivate me.  (http://www.apartmenttherapy.com) Apartment Therapy’s “Small Cool” book top’s the list.
I really miss my small cool home viewing this site http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/big-book/ ..now, how to take these ideas and be brave enough to incorporate them on a larger scale?

Sellers Quickly Transform Property with Paint

The best way to update a property is to paint it. It’s a job that many sellers can do themselves.

Here are six suggestions for making the work go quickly.

1. Move the furniture. Get as much furniture as possible out of the way, and then cover what’s left with plastic drop cloths held in place with masking tape.
2. Buy good paint. Top-quality latex interior paint will hide what’s underneath and make the job go faster.
3. Tape the edges. Taping the edges with painters tape will speed up the job and make the results more professional.
4. Work top down. Paint the ceiling first, then the walls, then the windows and trim and finally the baseboards. This will cut down on time spent repairing drips and splatter marks.
5. Cut in the corners. Applying a three-inch band of paint around the edges will allow you to fill in the middle with a paint roller.
6. Apply paint generously. Trying to stretch the paint won’t save sellers any money if they have to repaint.

Source: Paint Quality Institute (09/21/2010)