Local Farmers on TV

Please check out the latest segment of “Living Smarter with Councilmember Aaron Watson” that features our local farmers markets.
http://www.vimeo.com/26270966. It is currently airing throughout the day on ATL26, the city’s government access station through the end of July.

Change can be hard, but usually always worth it.  Studies show that a healthier life means a  longer life.  I’m pretty sure we can all agree, we’d enjoy that.  Of course there’s a catch.  One can’t just snap his fingers and be healthy.  Like everything, it takes hard work and time.

The first step is changing one’s diet.  Now this doesn’t mean nibble on lettuce day and night, but to make decisions that will benefit your body.  Vegetable and fruit are amazing natural sources of the vitamins we need to survive.  You don’t have to limit yourself to them, though.  Just make sure your intake of them is sufficient.  The protein found in meat is still needed, and eating it on a smaller scale is good for you.  But if you are a vegetarian, beans and fish also provide the protein needed.  Healthy foods have been added to the menu, but now it’s time to subtract the junk.  A snack or dessert is okay occasionally, but when eaten excessively, you are only causing damage.  Limit and control yourself.

 

When your body has enough nutrients and sugars to operate, the leftovers are stored away in pockets of fat.  The more that’s added, the larger they become.  This is why eating habits aren’t the only areas in your life needing change.  That’s right, movement is essential.  In other words GET UP! It’s easy to forget to exercise from being tired from work, watching your favorite program all day (while snacking of course!), or just being too tired and going straight to sleep.  People need at least half an hour of physical challenge per day.  This is bound to keep your body in shape.

 

These minor changes have major results, and are the stepping stones to a healthier lifestyle.  For more information visit http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/HealthyLivingIndex/HealthyLivingIndex.

 

 

By Cassia Preston

What to do on the Westside…

Information provided by Cheryl Case

*Civil Rights Symposium (Major League Baseball): Tuesday, April 19th at 5pm*
Major League Baseball is hosting its annual Civil Rights Game in Atlanta this May with the Braves being the hosting participant. As part of the Civil Rights Game, there will be extensive educational outreach programs.
Tomorrow evening, there will be a college symposium panel discussion with Civil Rights icons and Major League Baseball executives. There will be networking opportunities immediately following the symposium.
Contact: Sherry L. Turner, Ph.D., Executive Director/CEO Atlanta University Center Consortium, Inc.
Phone: 404-523-5778
E-mail: sturner@aucenter.edu
 
*Zone 1 Grand Opening Celebration*
April 19th at 930 Sells Avenue (Ashley Collegetown Apartments) Apt 1002 from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. I hope you all can make it. I think there will be free food, yum 🙂

*Atlanta Workforce **Development Agency Job Fair*
TUESDAY, APRIL 19, 2011; 8:00 AM – 11:00 AM
In order to attend the AWDA Job Fair, first time participants must complete
an online AWDA application at:
www.Atlantaworkforce.org<http://www.atlantaworkforce.org/>

and attend one orientation, Monday, Wednesday or Thursday: from 8:30 AM until 3:00 PM
Attire is professional, please have resumes ready to present to employers
818 Pollard Blvd, SW, Atlanta, Georgia 30315
Contact: (404) 546-3000
 
*Ashview Heights Yard Sale*
In an effort to build community awareness and pride. In efforts to raise money for street toppers and trash cans we are having a community yard sale.
If you all have a chance please let your community know that we will be have a yard sale April 23, 2011 8 am to 2 pm. We are expecting any donations of clothing, shoes, cash, electronics or any other household items. To contact for more information and/or to make donations: phylletheone@gmail.com
 
*Year Up Program
Free IT Training for *18-24 year olds* who live in the DC/MD/VA,
Providence/Boston, San Francisco bay area, Chicago, New York City,and *
Atlanta.*
 
 
If you know anyone with a high school diploma or a GED who are between the ages of 18-24 yrs old and have an interest in IT and computers…Refer them to this site *http://www.yearup.org/* to learn more about this free program.
This program asks for a 1 year commitment between the hours of 8:30 am and 5:00 pm.
 
They provide the student with a stipend and after six months, internships at companies such as Freddie Mac and AOL to name a few. Check out the website: *www.yearup.org*
 
About Year UP:
 
Year Up is a one-year, intensive training program that provides urban young adults 18-24, with a unique combination of technical and professional skills, college credits, an educational stipend and corporate apprenticeship.
 
Year UP has achieved excellent results to date: 100% placement of qualified students into apprenticeships; 83%student retention; 90% of apprentices meet or exceed apprenticeship partner expectations; 87% of graduates placed in full or part-time positions within 4 months of graduation.

Women as Key Change Agents for a Green, Local Economy

Smart Growth Online

Top Ten New Urban Communities List Targets Women as Key Change Agents for a Green, Local Economy. Good site for Green/Eco info. I’m looking forward to this wave here in our neighborhoods.

Atlanta and the Urban Future

Politics

Atlanta and the Urban Future

 

By ROB GURWITT, GOVERNING MAGAZINE – July 2008

 

A major American city has undergone big demographic changes overnight. Will others follow?

There is going to be a hard-fought campaign for mayor of Atlanta next year, and to understand it better, you might pay a visit to the Lighting Loft on Edgewood Avenue, in the city’s Old Fourth Ward. Not for any whispered political tips, but to look over the sleek and coolly sophisticated fixtures it sells: brushed-steel sconces, lamps in glass of the richest amber, cobalt blue pendants that could light a goat stall with hip urbanity.

 

What’s arresting about all this high-end domicile candy is where it’s located. A few minutes’ walk away, on Auburn Avenue, is the modest home where Martin Luther King Jr. was born; another block and you’re at Ebenezer Baptist Church, where King and his father preached. This is a nationally iconic black neighborhood, a fount of African-American culture and creativity through the middle third of the 20th century, but more recently an unsettling symbol of inner-city decay. You can still find small houses in need of repair, older black men hanging out on front porches, the occasional homeless addict wandering the streets. Yet they share space now with cafes, clothing galleries, expensively renovated homes and factories converted into upscale lofts. Almost any day of the week, one finds young white couples pushing baby strollers or checking out the progress of the new Japanese restaurant that’s going in.

 

The Old Fourth Ward is changing at a stunning clip. It has not thrown aside its past, and it is home to plenty of African-American professionals and executives, but it also is filling up with white suburbanites who are tired of two-hour daily commutes and who like the idea of living next to downtown.. Nor is the Old Fourth alone as a symbol of what seems to be Atlanta’s almost day-by-day transformation. White newcomers are picking up houses and condos in Cabbagetown and Midtown, in Edgewood, Kirkwood and Castleberry Hill, up at the new Atlantic Station project and downtown in mixed-income developments that have replaced some of the most legendarily dysfunctional public housing in America. “It has become classy,” says local political consultant Angelo Fuster, “to live in the city.”

 

There is really only one way to put it: Atlanta is becoming whiter, and at a pace that outstrips the rest of the nation. The white share of the city’s population, says Brookings Institution demographer William Frey, grew faster between 2000 and 2006 than that of any other U.S. city. It increased from 31 percent in 2000 to 35 percent in 2006, a numeric gain of 26,000, more than double the increase between 1990 and 2000. The trend seems to be gathering strength with each passing year. Only Washington, D.C., saw a comparable increase in white population share during those years, although several other big cities are starting to see it now.

 

This development is occurring at the same time that race and ethnicity are driving changes every bit as fundamental in Atlanta’s suburbs. For if the city itself is growing whiter, the Atlanta region is growing less white. The Atlanta Regional Commission reports that in 2000, the white, non-Hispanic population of the 20-county Atlanta metro region formed 60 percent of the total population; by 2006, that had shrunk to 54 percent, not so much because whites were leaving — although four counties did see absolute declines in white numbers — but because of the arrival in the suburbs of African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Africans and Caribbeans. Of the 10 counties in the nation with the largest declines in white percentage of the population from 2000 to 2006, six are in the suburbs of Atlanta.

 

Read more: http://www.governing.com/articles/0807atlanta.htm

WEND (West End Neighborhood Development) Meeting Oct 2nd

7PM at the Peeples Street Library. There will be discussion I’m sure on the Beltline and notes, comments and thoughts will be sure to be sent to the Study group since there is a time conflict.

Information about our community- now and future events. Use your voice- be apart of the change!