Buyers Want Flexibility Over Bigger Rooms

Smaller, versatile  space is trumping huge square footage among home buyers, according to the findings of at least one major home builder.

Designers at Beazer Homes are eliminating long hallways to open up plans. They also are scaling back master bedrooms.

“We found some masters were getting deeper, so the distance from the end of the bed to the dresser across from it was often more than five feet–a no man’s land. Instead, we’re tightening it up and putting that [square footage] somewhere else,” says Kent Goff, Beazer’s vice president of planning and design.

Preferred floor plans include a flexible space that can be attached to master to be used as either another bedroom or an office.

“[People] are looking for spaces that can be used in a couple of ways, depending on how they live their lives,” Goff says. “It’s all about usable, functional space, not just bigger rooms anymore.”

Source: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

“My Big Amazing Renovation”, is coming to Atlanta!

One of HGTV‘s newest weekly series, “My Big Amazing Renovation”, is coming to Atlanta, GA and surrounding areas to film BIG, AMAZING, renovations! Each half-hour episode features some of the most incredible renovations throughout the country and the inspiring homeowners who roll up their sleeves and transform their current home into their dream home!

We are currently looking for homeowners who are:

  • Just starting a major renovation (already past the permitting phase)
  • Are doubling the size of their house
  • Are transforming the original space including the kitchen
  • Have several unique design projects planned for the renovation
  • Have a set budget and time frame for the completion of the
    renovation
  • Are passionate about their renovation, and eager to share their
    experience with others
  • Please note: we are not actually paying for the renovation, just documenting the amazing transformation

The series will premiere this fall and is produced for HGTV by High Noon Entertainment in Denver, CO. You can learn more about High Noon Entertainment by visiting our website at www.highnoonentertainment.com.

Homeowners who would like to be considered for the program should contact Jenna Friederich at 303.712.3146.

Beltline design: ‘A lack of emphasis on quality’

YIKES!!!!!!!!!!!!

Check out this article: READ ME

As you know, I’ve been trying to follow the Beltline closely. One, because I live within a block away from the proposed path here in the West End, and two, many of my clients are moving to the West End/ Westview area because of it.

Although, there are MANY resources, and information on the subject, several website, news articles, study groups, focus groups- the list just goes on and on…..BUT, how could one keep up? This is why I have volunteered for the door- door campaign with the Beltline Partnership. Everyone does not have the luxury of being in a network with others pooling information- so during our door-door sweep, we hope to inform, educate and in some cases make aware for the first time -residents about the Beltline. This is a very important matter that will change and shape neighborhoods. YOU need to be aware of this and if possible- attend a meeting to have input on this.

As the NPU-T , Parks Recreation and Cultural Affairs committee obtain further informtion, I’ll post it. We has a committee specifically for the Beltline. So if you are a bit confused, or don’t know how to join or how to be apart of the discussions, please contact me and I will direct you to the appropriate contact within Neighborhood Planning Unit T…I’m sure we can use your help within our committee and bring you up to speed 🙂

Real Estate News | December 4, 2007

Homes Features that are Big Buyer Turnoffs

Old homes can be quaint, but there’s a difference between old and outdated. Unless home owners periodically invest in upgrades, their homes will fall so far below the standards of current buyers that they become obsolete and hard to sell.

What’s obsolete? Here’s a list of relics, many of them courtesy of Nick Kuhn, an associate with McEnearney Associates in Washington DC.

  • A house with only one bathroom. Even a house with one full bath and a toilet/sink powder room is going to turn buyers off.
  • A house without air conditioning.
  • Electrical systems protected by a fuse box instead of a circuit breaker.
  • Spiral staircases. They’re relatively rare, and for good reason they are unsafe.
  • Basements with only an outside entrance. Homeowners expect convenient access to that valuable space.
  • Ceilings that look like they’ve been stuccoed, dropped ceilings with fluorescent lights, and dark beams cutting across the ceiling.
  • The split-level floor plan. Want to go from kitchen to family room? Go down half a flight of stairs. From living room to bedroom? Up half a flight. Most folks would rather not.

Source: The Washington Post, Elizabeth Razzi (12/02/07)

Our Neighbors are always on the job…

This article was on the Creative Loafing site:

Residents: Developer souring West End flavor

BY MARA SHALHOUP

Published 09.04.02

On the block of Sells Avenue that turns from antiquated streetscape to I-20 entrance ramp, a house has been built that doesn’t look like the other houses on the street, a handful of residents complain. In fact, the house doesn’t look much like anything in the West End Historic District, they say. And for that reason, it’s wrecking everything.

“I’m leading the charge to make sure the builder doesn’t build more houses like this one in West End,” says neighborhood association zoning chairman Alex Blackmore.

The vinyl-sided, pre-fab, modular structure (described in the builder’s city application as a “pyramid-roofed cottage”) isn’t exactly in the heart of the historic district. But to people like Angela Lain, that matters not. Lain, who has lived for two years in West End and is currently renovating a turn-of-the-century Victorian, says a house like the one on Sells Avenue threatens the district as a whole.

Technically, that block of Sells Avenue is protected by the historic district ordinance — but only as of a month ago, when the district’s boundaries were extended.

“I understand how important this is to stand up for, even on the periphery,” Lain says.

“Because if this gets through, it will be hard to stop it from going through on another street.”

The house did get through, though, passing the Atlanta Urban Design Commission’s muster with a 5-4 vote Aug. 14. The commission ordered the builder, Integrated Development LLC, to take steps to ensure the house has a historic flair, though. And according to minutes from the meeting, the commission denied two other houses the builder proposed for the neighboring lots.

Yet pieces of another modular house were delivered to a nearby lot last week, says Blackmore, who points out that the builder has applied for two additional structures on the even more historic Gordon Place.

“Somebody brought a house, on a truck,” says an indignant Karl Webster Barnes, West End historian, “and was backing it into this yard.”