Top 10 Most Heavily Taxed States

It’s April, so people’s thoughts are turning to taxes, and where they live makes a big difference in how much they pay.

Here are the 10 states with the highest taxes, including property, individual income, sales, alcoholic beverages, tobacco, motor vehicles, hunting and fishing, motor fuels, death and gift taxes, as well as insurance premiums. The per capita tax was derived by adding up all the taxes and dividing the total by the number of citizens.

1. Vermont, $3,861
2. Hawaii, $3,856
3. Connecticut, $3,596
4. Minnesota, $3,203
5. New Jersey, $3,024
6. New York, $3,019
7. Massachusetts, $2,953
8. Washington, $2,553
9. Wyoming, $2,357
10. Pennsylvania, $2,223

Source: Forbes, Matt Woolsey (03/30/2009)

Survey: The World’s Next Great Cities

Cities that were not so long ago little more than big fishing villages are rising to global commercial prominence.

Using the MasterCard Worldwide Emerging Markets Index, which ranks 65 cities in 30 markets on the basis of business environment, economic growth, and financial services environment, Forbes magazine chose the world’s next great cities.

Turbulence in world markets is affecting some of them, but others are mostly escaping these issues.

“Many of these emerging economies have not been as financialized as those in established countries,” said Saskia Sassen, a professor on Columbia University’s Committee on Global Thought.

Here are the top 10 emerging cities:

  1. Shanghai, China
  2. Beijing, China
  3. Budapest Hungary
  4. Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
  5. Santiago, Chile
  6. Guangzhou, China
  7. Mexico City, Mexico
  8. Warsaw, Poland
  9. Bangkok Thailand
  10. Shenzhen, China

Source: Forbes, Matt Woolsey

Atlanta made the list…

10 Cities Where Jobs, Home Prices Are Growing

Forbes.com looked at projections for housing starts from the National Association of Home Builders and job-growth projections from Moody’s Economy.com.

To determine where home prices are expected to rise most in the next couple of years,

Forbes identified cities that are likely to be vibrant markets because jobs are increasing and the housing market wasn’t overbuilt during the boom.

“The logic is pretty straightforward,” says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Economy.com. “People will spend as much on housing as their income will allow them. House prices are very closely tied to household income over the long run when you look at business cycles.”

According to Forbes, these are the 10 cities where home prices are most likely to rise:

  • Albuquerque, N.M.
  • Charlotte, N.C.
  • San Antonio, Texas
  • Portland, Ore.
  • Austin, Texas
  • Salt Lake City, Utah
  • Colorado Springs, Colo.
  • Minneapolis
  • Atlanta
  • Oklahoma City

Source: Forbes.com, Matt Woolsey

10 Best Places for House Bargains

Atlanta SHOULD be on this list!!!

Daily Real Estate News  |   February 11, 2008

The best place to get a bargain on a home is an area where there is healthy job growth and more houses available than people to buy them.

These are markets “where you have high inventories but pliable borrowers, with lenders willing to deal,” says Anthony Sanders, a professor of finance at Arizona State University.

Forbes magazine went looking for markets where the damage from risky lending hasn’t been as dramatic as in some parts of the country and where employment growth will burn off an over-abundance of inventory quickly.

Here are what the magazine considers the 10 best cities for bargain house hunters.

1. Salt Lake City, Utah. Developers have gotten ahead of the demand, but the city is adding jobs more quickly than practically any place else in the country.

2. Raleigh, N.C. Another place where building got ahead of the curve, but the economy is expanding quickly.

3. Orlando, Fla. This part of the state had fewer speculators than Miami and Tampa, and it’s adding jobs faster than those cities as well.

4. Charlotte, N.C. The financial industry is moving here, adding jobs, but the inventory of unsold homes is still significant.

5. Phoenix. This city had a high foreclosure rate, but the economy is growing and people are still moving here in large numbers.

6. Seattle. The city’s port has profited from the weak dollar, but the housing price growth has slowed.

7. Las Vegas. This market was hit hard by foreclosures, but the growing economy makes the huge inventory less toxic than it is many places.

8. Jacksonville, Fla. The foreclosure rate is slower than the rest of the Florida cities, making the large inventory likely to improve.

9. Richmond, Va. There is only one foreclosure per 1,103 households here (compared to 1 in 33 in Detroit). Still, there are plenty of homes on the market.

10. Houston. Homes in Houston have long been a bargain. While there have been plenty of foreclosures, the population and the economy are expanding.

Source: Forbes, Matt Woolsey (02/07/08)