New Orleans was wonderful….

 We did a lot in 5 days! Can you tell?   

    
    
  

    
    
    
   

   

  

  

  

   
    
    
 

   
    
    
 
   
    
 
   
    
   
   
   
   
    
   
   
   
 
    
   

   
   
     
    
   
   

   
 
   
    
 

NeighborWorks, when Neighbors Work

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About 3 years ago  I was able to spend a week attending a NeighborWorks community development/stabilization conference and classes.  A few weeks prior, I found out I was pregnant with my 3rd child. I KNEW it would not be easy to attend as all of my pregnancies have been “high risk”, however  “not easy “  was an understatement.  In between violently vomiting (all day “morning sickness”), sharp muscle spasms in my back,  and having a condition which produced excessive  saliva, I was able to network with others dedicated to community development and rebuilding blighted urban areas.  It was one of the most draining and yet- exciting times in my life, especially being that it was held in New Orleans….a city not fully recovered from the Katrina devastation. 

I can not believe that was nearly 3 years ago. Ironically,  like in childbirth the pains and hardship one endures in that time (before and during labor) become a memory, once that which you anticipate has arrived.  Now, it’s just the growing pains.

We have  hundreds of  Non-Profits in the West End of Atlanta and many new businesses come to our NPU seeking support with this status and mission to help rebuild. Most claim to do  community development, or provide homebuyer resources.  Honestly, I have seen very little impact from any agency within my neighborhoods.  Yes, we do have UCDC (University Community Development Corporation) who have successfully participated in the NSP program-  rehabed and resold homes to a few owner occupants. However, the success ratio of these non-profits make it very difficult for me to support them.

 Why are those who have made it their business to redevelop communities limited in their accomplishments? Some will say they are lacking financial resources (grants are limited) and others may be lacking support.  I personally believe the “business” of  community development can not be a 9-5 Mon- Friday business alone.   There were many things I learned during the week in New Orleans,  one thing that resonates throughout my community is that a stabilized safe  neighborhood can not be built without resident involvement.  In our communities, what I do see are  neighbors with no affiliation to anything, nor  “C3’s”   bringing in new residents, orchestrating clean ups, and public safety meetings.

 In that spirit, this January 2013, Area West Realty will  join with  “Committed To Communities” in their event sponsored by The Beltline Team, Invest Atlanta and Wells Fargo Neighborhood Lift on a mission to support our neighbors with their efforts of community development.   During this time, we will showcase available homes,  affordability programs and some of the best features in our communities.  We are making available, the City of Atlanta, bank reps and * RRC for one on one (no-strings-attached) conversations.  We only need YOU

Mark your calendar January 12th for this event. We appreciate our neighbors and will have special “Thank You’s” for YOUR community development efforts.  ( more information to come).

Side Note:

Reynoldstown Revitalization Corporation, or RRC has successfully helped many potential home owners work on their credit, understand the home buying and ownership process.

I  also encourage those in the business, and neighbors NOT in the business,  to invest in additional training at NeighborWorks America.  The information received is priceless, the connections made will change lives.

For information on past Committed to Communities events.

Home Featured in Pitt Movie Selling for $2.85M

The New Orleans home that was used in the filming of much of “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” is for sale.

The film is a cinematic version of a 1921 short story of the same name written by F. Scott Fitzgerald about a man who grows younger rather than older. The story opens in a New Orleans home geared for older adults. The film has been nominated for 13 Oscars.

“The 7,800-square-foot Garden District mansion featured in the film is much nicer than what people saw in the movie,” says Dorian Bennett, who listed the house on behalf of his firm Dorian Bennett Sotheby’s International Realty. “It’s more like Tara than a home for old people.”

The house, which has six bedrooms and bathrooms, a library and a reception hall, is priced at $2.85 million and is on the market to settle the estate of the late owner.

Source: The Associated Press 02/05/09

Weather Delays Some Louisiana Home Closings

Some closings in New Orleans were delayed by the impending hurricane, mostly because buyers waited until the last minute to secure a homeowner’s insurance policy.

Robert Bergeron, president of Crescent Title, said about a third of the company’s closings were delayed. Most of the delays involved insurance issues, but in a few cases the buyers had language in their sale contract allowing a delay in the event of a hurricane.

But most real estate professionals – and buyers – were savvy enough not to be delayed, says Glenn Gardner, president of operations at Prudential Gardener.

“Since Katrina, people have needed time to shop around to get the best price for their insurance and get it bound way ahead of time,” Gardner says. “For the most part, they already had their insurance set up before Gustav was a threat.”

Source: Times-Picayune, Kate Moran 8/30/

Fastest Growing Real Estate Markets

Despite the housing crisis, there are cities where prices are expected to rise significantly in the coming years. Here are the top 10 cites where analysts for Money Magazines expect price appreciation.

  1. McAllen, Texas
  2. Rochester, N.Y.
  3. Birmingham, Ala.
  4. Syracuse, N.Y.
  5. Buffalo/Niagara Falls, N.Y.
  6. New Orleans, La.
  7. Scranton, Pa.
  8. Grand Rapids, Mich.
  9. Baton Rouge, La.
  10. El Paso, Texas

Source: Money 06/15/