How can the ARRA benefit for you?

What is the ARRA’ 09?

On Tuesday, February 17, 2009 P.L. 111-5(H.R.I) the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) was signed into law by the President.  ARRA includes key provision that impact individuals and families.

The “Making Work Pay”Tax Credit will cut taxes for working families in 2009 and 2010 by providing a refundable credit of up to $400 for working individuals and $800 for those who are married filing jointly. The credit is phased out once your income exceeds a certain limit. It is being paid to employees through a reduction in their federal income tax withholding starting in April 2009. The IRS has a “Withholding Calculator” available at WWW.IRS.gov, check it out and make sure you are having the proper amount withheld to avoid owing the IRS.

The “Economic Recovery Payment”is provided for individuals who no longer work and are receiving SS,  SSI, RR benefits or Veterans Disability payments. This $250 payment will come directly through the same channels in which you’re now receiving benefits and will reduce the amount of “Making Work Pay” credit you may receive.

Earned Income Tax Credit and Child Tax Credits will increase, allowing for a larger credit for 3 or more children and a higher threshold of income eligible to receive the credits

The American Opportunity Education Credit is now expanding from and replacing the former “Hope” credit, to cover the first 4 years of qualifying post secondary education expense. A 40% credit up to $2,500 per year.

First-Time Home-Buyer credit has increased to $8000, from homes purchased from 01/01/2009- 11/30/2009. If you live in the home for at least three years, you wont have to pay it back!!

Energy Conservation Incentives for a variety of energy saving upgrades or additions to your home, including : Windows, doors, insulation,roofing, HVAC,water-heaters,bio-mass stoves and more. This credit of up to $1500, could also help you save on your electric bill.

Unemployment Benefits, a temporary suspension of federal income tax is now available on the first $2400 of unemployment benefits received in 2009. Voluntary with-holdings be requested on form W-4V.

New Car Sales Tax Deduction for sales taxes paid on the first $49,500 of the cost of a vehicle purchased after 02/16/2009. (For individuals with income limits under $125,000/$250,000 if jointly) And you don’t have to itemize to get it!

For more information on the ARRA ’09 provisions see the website: WWW.IRS.GOV

All information above is from the IRS website

Details of the $ 8,000 Purchase Incentive

This is current information comparing the previous Tax Credit and the Current First Time Home Buyer Tax Credit in place now due to the Stimulus Package signed today by the President. 
 
Stimulus Plan First-Time Homebuyer Tax Credit:
The Stimulus Plan was signed into law by President Obama. It contains a new tax credit for first-time homebuyers. Essentially, first-time homebuyers within certain income limits who purchase a home in 2009 before December 1, 2009 will receive a tax credit of up to $8,000. The program is similar to the $7,500 tax credit which applied to home purchases made in 2008 after April 9. A comparison of the two credit programs is outlined below.

While the Stimulus Plan was still being debated, the Senate version originally included a $15,000 tax credit for all homebuyers. To lower the cost of the Stimulus Plan, the final version of the Plan contained this smaller tax credit, and this tax credit is applicable only to first-time homebuyers

To qualify as a first-time home buyer as defined in the programs, the purchaser (and the purchaser’s spouse) may not have owned a home in the three years prior to the purchase date of the home. Single family homes qualify for the program. The home must be the primary residence.
 
Both tax credits are subject to the same adjusted gross income limitations (full credit for AGI less than $75,000 single/$150,000 joint, phased out for AGI up to $95,000 single/ $170,000 joint).
 
The amount for either credit is the lesser of 10% of the home purchase price or $7,500 or $8,000, as applicable.
While a purchaser still owns the home, the $7,500 credit must be repaid in equal payments over a period of 15 years, starting with the 2010 tax filing. The $8,000 credit will not need to be repaid. Again, the $7,500 credit needs to be repaid, while the $8,000 credit does not!
 
Upon sale of the home, any portion of the $7,500 credit not yet repaid is due in full.  No portion of the $8,000 credit is due upon sale of the home, if the home is owned for more than three years.  If the home is sold within the first three years, the full amount of the credit is due upon sale.
 
The $7,500 credit was not available to any purchaser utilizing state/local revenue bond money to help finance the home purchase.
There is no such restriction on the $8,000 credit.
 
Under both the $7,500 and the $8,000 programs, the credit will be claimed on the purchaser’s income taxes. Any amount in excess of taxes owed will be refunded to the purchaser.
 
Additional information about the tax credit can be found on the websites of the National Association of Realtors (www.realtor.org) and the National Association of Home Builders
http://www.nahb.org .  You also may want to check out the website recovery.gov

*The above information was received from:

Jay Mitchell, Mortgage Planner FIMC . Phone: 678-413-3222/ Fax:770-929-3461. Be sure to view his website:

Jay@LoansByJay.com
www.LoansByJay.com