Ashview Heights…another intown community making a comeback!

Finally- I see some of the fruits of my labor…and this one was easy.  It was as simple as having a motivated buyer untainted by the city prejudice views of many of our SW communities. OK, this is not so easy.  My buyer- Larry Carter, currently the President of this emerging community.  Larry and I met by referral, shortly after I closed another $25K “gem” in West End back in 2009.   Larry not only had cash to buy, he had VISION because he knew his cash was up against investors with even more cash.  While everyone was busy snatching up homes in Historic West End and Westview, Larry set his sights on a less desirable area- just 1 block away- Ashview Heights.  Larry purchased a home that looked like it would be ready for tear down or a match….even I did not want to go in to show him LOL.. again, he was brave and with vision!  Today it would be VERY hard to believe its the SAME home..he’s renovated it himself …slowly, weekly making it’s value triple the purchase price! 

Take a peek into Ashview Heights and let’s make YOU my  next blog story:

Welcome to Ashview Heights Atlanta’s downtown urban escape. Ashview Heights, a community along Atlanta’s Belt Line, is perfectly nestled between downtown Atlanta,West End, Westview and Atlanta University Center. Ashview Heights is Atlanta’s in town bright star; it offers suburban life in the city. We are a diverse community, ranging from single young professionals, families and seniors. Come get involved! We have the first edible garden on the Belt Line which each member of the community is welcomed to plant and grow their own herbs and vegetables.

Commute free-living! Working downtown? You can come home for your lunch break and be back to work on time. Oh the kids have Parent Teacher Conference? NO problem the local schools are near the heart of the community. M. Agnes Jones Elementary,Kipp Ways Academy,Kipp Strive Academy, Booker T. Washington High School are all less then a mile from our community.

 Let’s talk to your future neighbors:

Larry Carter, Ashview Heights Association’s current president: I purchased my home in 2009 for 10,000 dollars. It was the best money I have ever spent! I have a five bedroom three bathroom home that is everything I need and more. I had to do a little work but it was a blank canvas I created my perfect home in the city. There is a sense of community here.

 Debra Parker, Active Ashview Heights Association memberMy family and I moved to Ashview Heights because we have always wanted to live near downtown. We looked in several neighborhoods surrounding downtown and made the decision to call Ashview Heights home. We love the history as well as the architectural detail of the homes. My kids are having a ball making new friends as well as taking advantage of the great programs that the neighborhood schools have to offer. We look forward to planting roots here for many years to come. We just have one question. Would you like to be our neighbor?

 Have and questions? Want to take a walking tour? Contact us at AshviewHeights@gmail.com . Make sure you become a friend on FaceBook www.facebook.com/Ashview.Heights log on see what is happening in the community and some of the homes for sale. See you soon Neighbor!

Some home photos:

Single Buyers Choosing Suburbia Over Cities

Some 52 percent of single home buyers in April chose suburban locations over urban and rural areas, according to a survey by Coldwell Banker of 1,000 single buyers.

· More than 53 percent of single home owners reported that they purchased a home because it was more cost effective than renting in their area, while 68 percent of single home owners purchased a home that was less expensive than they believed they could have afforded to pay.

· Some 55 percent have less than a 30-minute commute to their office or work from home.

· Singles don’t shy away from foreclosures – especially single men. Thirty-eight percent would currently consider purchasing a foreclosed/short sale home, compared to 29 percent of single women.

· Of the 13 percent of single home owners who own their home jointly with another person, 49 percent made the purchase with their parents. Forty percent live less than 30 minutes or even in the same neighborhood as their parents or extended family. An additional 12 percent live with at least one family member.

· Number of bedrooms is important to 27 percent of single women, while only 18 percent of men were concerned.

Source: Coldwell Banker Real Estate (06/18/2010)

FHA Program Offers Purchase, Renovation Aid

The Federal Housing Administration is encouraging use of its little-known 203(k) loan program.

The 203(k) lets an owner-occupant borrow money for both the purchase and renovation in one loan, and put down only 3.5 percent.

The program requires the use of credentialed contractors and can include cosmetic improvements as well as major renovations like replacing plumbing or electrical. Completing the application process requires patience, says Nancy Hammock, an associate with RE/MAX Properties in Western Springs, Ill.

But in this lending environment, more homebuyers are finding 203(k)s worth the hassle. In fiscal 2008, the government insured about 6,700 of the 203(k) loans. This year, more than 11,000 loans have already been insured, according to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency.

Source: Chicago Tribune, Mary Ellen Podmolik

Long-Distance Migration Is on the Rise

The percentage of consumers who moved more than 1,000 miles has nearly doubled in the last year, according to a survey conducted for Relocation.com, an online resource for moving services.

More than 70 percent of the people on the move relocated farther than 1,000 miles in the 12 months ending in March 2009. In the previous year, only 36 percent went that far, Relocation.com reported.

Of those who moved more than 1,000 miles, 60 percent said the move was for financial reasons such as a lost job. Nearly 41 percent of long-distance movers indicated that the recession and the housing crisis influenced their decision to move.

Only 3 percent of those surveyed indicated that they had lost a home to foreclosure, while 13 percent reported that they had lost their jobs.

“We are seeing more out-of-state moves from traditionally popular destinations, likely because of high foreclosure rates and diminished property values,” says Sharon Asher, CEO of Relocation.com.

Source: Relocation.com (05/05/2009)

Details of the $ 8,000 Purchase Incentive

This is current information comparing the previous Tax Credit and the Current First Time Home Buyer Tax Credit in place now due to the Stimulus Package signed today by the President. 
 
Stimulus Plan First-Time Homebuyer Tax Credit:
The Stimulus Plan was signed into law by President Obama. It contains a new tax credit for first-time homebuyers. Essentially, first-time homebuyers within certain income limits who purchase a home in 2009 before December 1, 2009 will receive a tax credit of up to $8,000. The program is similar to the $7,500 tax credit which applied to home purchases made in 2008 after April 9. A comparison of the two credit programs is outlined below.

While the Stimulus Plan was still being debated, the Senate version originally included a $15,000 tax credit for all homebuyers. To lower the cost of the Stimulus Plan, the final version of the Plan contained this smaller tax credit, and this tax credit is applicable only to first-time homebuyers

To qualify as a first-time home buyer as defined in the programs, the purchaser (and the purchaser’s spouse) may not have owned a home in the three years prior to the purchase date of the home. Single family homes qualify for the program. The home must be the primary residence.
 
Both tax credits are subject to the same adjusted gross income limitations (full credit for AGI less than $75,000 single/$150,000 joint, phased out for AGI up to $95,000 single/ $170,000 joint).
 
The amount for either credit is the lesser of 10% of the home purchase price or $7,500 or $8,000, as applicable.
While a purchaser still owns the home, the $7,500 credit must be repaid in equal payments over a period of 15 years, starting with the 2010 tax filing. The $8,000 credit will not need to be repaid. Again, the $7,500 credit needs to be repaid, while the $8,000 credit does not!
 
Upon sale of the home, any portion of the $7,500 credit not yet repaid is due in full.  No portion of the $8,000 credit is due upon sale of the home, if the home is owned for more than three years.  If the home is sold within the first three years, the full amount of the credit is due upon sale.
 
The $7,500 credit was not available to any purchaser utilizing state/local revenue bond money to help finance the home purchase.
There is no such restriction on the $8,000 credit.
 
Under both the $7,500 and the $8,000 programs, the credit will be claimed on the purchaser’s income taxes. Any amount in excess of taxes owed will be refunded to the purchaser.
 
Additional information about the tax credit can be found on the websites of the National Association of Realtors (www.realtor.org) and the National Association of Home Builders
http://www.nahb.org .  You also may want to check out the website recovery.gov

*The above information was received from:

Jay Mitchell, Mortgage Planner FIMC . Phone: 678-413-3222/ Fax:770-929-3461. Be sure to view his website:

Jay@LoansByJay.com
www.LoansByJay.com