More than 1,200 Expected for Atlanta BeltLine Running Series Eastside 10K

December 1 Event Features First Official Run on New Eastside Trail  and Exciting Tailgate and Neighborhood Challenges

WHAT:                 More than 1,200 runners and walkers will convene for the second annual Atlanta BeltLine Eastside 10K. This first official run/walk on the new Eastside Trail tours runners and walkers through a number of Atlanta’s most scenic neighborhoods, parks and trails before returning for post-race activities. This event features both an Alumni Tailgate Challenge and a Neighborhood Challenge.

WHEN:                 Saturday, Dec. 1; Race kicks off at 10 a.m.

WHERE:               Race kicks off at Stoveworks – 112 Krog Street Northeast  Atlanta, GA 30307

 

PHOTO OPPS:   

  • 1,200+ participants running along Atlanta’s newest trail and through some of Atlanta’s most popular neighborhoods
  • Alumni Tailgate Challenge to boost team spirits leading into the SEC Championship. Teams being represented include Agnes Scott University, Auburn University, Georgia State University, Georgia College and State University, Kansas State University, University of Georgia, and Vanderbilt University, with more to come.
  • Neighborhood Challenge, in which neighborhood associations will compete for a $1,000 cash purse to be awarded to the fastest, largest, and most spirited neighborhood teams

 

More details about the Atlanta BeltLine Running Series – including parking and other details for the the Atlanta BeltLine Eastside 10K, challenges and other races, can be found at http://run.beltline.org.

COST: On-site registration is $45, with proceeds benefitting the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership.

 

 

 About the Atlanta BeltLine

The Atlanta BeltLine is the most comprehensive economic development effort ever undertaken in the City of Atlanta and among the largest, most wide-ranging urban redevelopment and mobility projects currently underway in the United States. The Atlanta BeltLine is a sustainable redevelopment project that will provide a network of public parks, multi-use trails and transit along a historic 22-mile railroad corridor circling downtown and connecting many neighborhoods directly to each other. Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. (ABI) is the entity tasked with planning and executing the implementation of the Atlanta BeltLine in partnership with other public and private organizations, including City of Atlanta departments.

 

About the Atlanta BeltLine Partnership

The Atlanta BeltLine Partnership (ABLP) is a non-profit organization committed to raising funds from private and philanthropic sources to support the Atlanta BeltLine, working with the community and partners to raise general awareness and support, and serving as a catalyst to mobilize resources to address social concerns.  For more information on the Atlanta BeltLine, please visit www.BeltLine.org.

ATLANTA BELTLINE ANNOUNCES 2012 SOUTHWEST 5K

ATLANTA BELTLINE ANNOUNCES 2012 SOUTHWEST 5K

Saturday, July 14 Run Will Feature Teams Competing for $500 Cash Purse

 

ATLANTA (May 23, 2012) The 2012 Atlanta BeltLine Running Series – presented by Internal Data Resources (IDR) – announces its second event of the year, the Atlanta BeltLine Southwest 5K. A Run/Walk along the Atlanta BeltLine Southwest Trail and through the Historic West End and Westview neighborhoods, the Atlanta BeltLine Southwest 5K race course is a great way to explore local parks, connect with Atlanta BeltLine communities, and experience a ¾-mile off-road jaunt within the Atlanta BeltLine corridor.  

The Atlanta BeltLine Southwest 5K will begin at 7:30 a.m. – runners should plan to arrive by 6:30 a.m. – and will include exciting features such as:

·        Route showcasing Art on the Atlanta BeltLine exhibits, such as the White Street Mural

  • Teams competing for the $500 and representing community businesses, schools and run clubs
    • Awarded to the fastest team, the largest team and the most spirited team

·        Exciting new challenge that rewards participants with points and shows a leaderboard standing for runners

·        Indoor post-race activities at Space Atlanta

·        Music by Wild 105.7

  • Fun, creatively-designed t-shirts
  • Awards designed by Coasters by Hazel
  • Great Post-Race nourishment courtesy of EVOS
  • Course friendly to strollers and dogs as well

“It’s exciting to see the Atlanta BeltLine Running Series grow with such momentum, and to know that we are living up to our vision of providing more opportunities for Atlantans to get active and live healthy lifestyles,” said Atlanta BeltLine Partnership Executive Director Valarie Wilson. “The Southwest 5K is particularly special because it offers the opportunity to explore an exciting, scenic route through beautiful historic West End and Westview neighborhoods while enjoying a vigorous run or walk.”

 

 

Registration is open and additional information is available at Run.BeltLine.org.


Proceeds from the Atlanta BeltLine Running Series support Atlanta BeltLine Partnership programs vital to the Atlanta BeltLine, including tours and other public outreach.

 

About the Atlanta BeltLine

The Atlanta BeltLine is a $2.8 billion redevelopment project that will provide a network of public parks, multi-use trails and transit along a historic 22-mile railroad corridor circling downtown and connecting many neighborhoods directly to each other. The Atlanta BeltLine is the most comprehensive economic development effort ever undertaken in the City of Atlanta and among the largest, most wide-ranging urban redevelopment projects currently underway in the United States. Atlanta BeltLine, Inc. (ABI), formed by the Atlanta Development Authority, is the entity tasked with planning and executing the implementation of the Atlanta BeltLine in partnership with other public and private organizations, including City of Atlanta departments. 

 

The Atlanta BeltLine Partnership (ABLP) is a non-profit organization committed to raising funds from private and philanthropic sources to support the Atlanta BeltLine, working with the community and partners to raise general awareness and support, and serving as a catalyst to mobilize resources to address social concerns. For more information on the Atlanta BeltLine, please visit www.BeltLine.org.

Atlanta BeltLine 5K Run/Walk

Saturday, June 26 9:30a

at Rose Circle Park, Atlanta, GA

Celebrate the opening of the new Atlanta BeltLine trail in Southwest Atlanta as we run, jog and walk through Historic West End and Historic Westview. The Westview Centennial Barbeque will follow the BeltLine 5K and give our guests a taste of the rich culture found on the Westside of Atlanta.

Race starts at Rose Circle Park & finishes at Kipp Strive Academy, 1444 Lucile Ave, 30310

Atlanta and the Urban Future

Politics

Atlanta and the Urban Future

 

By ROB GURWITT, GOVERNING MAGAZINE – July 2008

 

A major American city has undergone big demographic changes overnight. Will others follow?

There is going to be a hard-fought campaign for mayor of Atlanta next year, and to understand it better, you might pay a visit to the Lighting Loft on Edgewood Avenue, in the city’s Old Fourth Ward. Not for any whispered political tips, but to look over the sleek and coolly sophisticated fixtures it sells: brushed-steel sconces, lamps in glass of the richest amber, cobalt blue pendants that could light a goat stall with hip urbanity.

 

What’s arresting about all this high-end domicile candy is where it’s located. A few minutes’ walk away, on Auburn Avenue, is the modest home where Martin Luther King Jr. was born; another block and you’re at Ebenezer Baptist Church, where King and his father preached. This is a nationally iconic black neighborhood, a fount of African-American culture and creativity through the middle third of the 20th century, but more recently an unsettling symbol of inner-city decay. You can still find small houses in need of repair, older black men hanging out on front porches, the occasional homeless addict wandering the streets. Yet they share space now with cafes, clothing galleries, expensively renovated homes and factories converted into upscale lofts. Almost any day of the week, one finds young white couples pushing baby strollers or checking out the progress of the new Japanese restaurant that’s going in.

 

The Old Fourth Ward is changing at a stunning clip. It has not thrown aside its past, and it is home to plenty of African-American professionals and executives, but it also is filling up with white suburbanites who are tired of two-hour daily commutes and who like the idea of living next to downtown.. Nor is the Old Fourth alone as a symbol of what seems to be Atlanta’s almost day-by-day transformation. White newcomers are picking up houses and condos in Cabbagetown and Midtown, in Edgewood, Kirkwood and Castleberry Hill, up at the new Atlantic Station project and downtown in mixed-income developments that have replaced some of the most legendarily dysfunctional public housing in America. “It has become classy,” says local political consultant Angelo Fuster, “to live in the city.”

 

There is really only one way to put it: Atlanta is becoming whiter, and at a pace that outstrips the rest of the nation. The white share of the city’s population, says Brookings Institution demographer William Frey, grew faster between 2000 and 2006 than that of any other U.S. city. It increased from 31 percent in 2000 to 35 percent in 2006, a numeric gain of 26,000, more than double the increase between 1990 and 2000. The trend seems to be gathering strength with each passing year. Only Washington, D.C., saw a comparable increase in white population share during those years, although several other big cities are starting to see it now.

 

This development is occurring at the same time that race and ethnicity are driving changes every bit as fundamental in Atlanta’s suburbs. For if the city itself is growing whiter, the Atlanta region is growing less white. The Atlanta Regional Commission reports that in 2000, the white, non-Hispanic population of the 20-county Atlanta metro region formed 60 percent of the total population; by 2006, that had shrunk to 54 percent, not so much because whites were leaving — although four counties did see absolute declines in white numbers — but because of the arrival in the suburbs of African Americans, Hispanics, Asians, Africans and Caribbeans. Of the 10 counties in the nation with the largest declines in white percentage of the population from 2000 to 2006, six are in the suburbs of Atlanta.

 

Read more: http://www.governing.com/articles/0807atlanta.htm