Architecture Coach: Prairie

In suburban Chicago in 1893, Frank Lloyd Wright, America’s most famous architect, designed the first Prairie-style house, and it’s still a common style throughout the Midwest. Prairie houses come in two styles–boxy and symmetrical or low-slung and asymmetrical. Roofs are low-pitched, with wide eaves. Brick and clapboard are the most common building materials. Other details: rows of casement windows; one-story porches with massive square supports; and stylized floral and circular geometric terra-cotta or masonry ornamentation around doors, windows, and cornices. (Realtor.Org)

Any Prairie’s in Atlanta? I need pictures

Cool website: www.Prairiemod.com  (love this site)

Photo © Kenneth C. Zirkel / iStockphoto.com

The Frederic C. Robie House in Chicago is widely considered Frank Lloyd Wright’s finest example of the Prairie style. It was built in 1909.

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Residential Style- Not your typical Shotgun

FMLS#3756417  949 Beecher Street, Atlanta GA 30310 List price 450K

Architecture Guide:

Tradition has it that if you fire a shotgun through the front doorway of this long, narrow home, the bullet will exit directly through the back door. The style is characterized by a single story with a gabled roof. Shotguns are usually only one room wide, with each room leading directly into the next. Exterior features include a vent on the front gable and a full front porch trimmed with gingerbread brackets and ornamentation. Mail-order plans and parts for shotgun homes were widely available at the turn-of-the-century, making it a popular, low-cost structure to build in both urban and suburban settings

Architecture Coach:Queen Anne

A sub-style of the late Victorian era, Queen Anne is a collection of coquettish detailing and eclectic materials. Steep cross-gabled roofs, towers, and vertical windows are all typical of a Queen Anne home. Inventive, multistory floor plans often include projecting wings, several porches and balconies, and multiple chimneys with decorative chimney pots.

Wooden “gingerbread” trim in scrolled and rounded “fish-scale” patterns frequently graces gables and porches. Massive cut stone foundations are typical of period houses. Created by English architect Richard Norman Shaw, the style was popularized after the Civil War by architect Henry Hobson Richardson and spread rapidly, especially in the South and West.

Information and photo taken from www.Realtor.org

Small Homes, Cottages Score Big With Buyers

However, home buyers these days increasingly are interested in smaller homes that consume less energy and encourage interaction among neighbors.

Developers in cities such as Seattle, Boston, and Milwaukee are building cottage developments to meet the rising demand.

Architect Ross Chapin and developer Jim Soules have erected nearly 50 Craftsman-style cottages during the last 10 years in the Seattle area. (Watch Video: Choosing Cottages Over McMansions)

The quirky homes sell for as much as $600,000, despite the fact that they range in size from just 800 square feet to 1,500 square feet.

Chapin uses clever design tricks, such as corner windows and skylights, to give the illusion of more space. He also makes the most of every inch by including crawlspace storage and built-in bookshelves and cubbies.

“These days, we drive to the house, open the garage door, go in,” Indianapolis developer Casey Land told the Wall Street Journal. “But it’s important to get to know your neighbors. I think people miss that.”

Source: Wall Street Journal, Sara Lin (07/18/08..)

Architecture Coach: Craftsman

Popularized at the turn of the 20th century by architect and furniture designer Gustav Stickley in his magazine, The Craftsman, the Craftsman-style bungalow reflected, said Stickley, “a house reduced to it’s simplest form… its low, broad proportions and absolute lack of ornamentation gives it a character so natural and unaffected that it seems to… blend with any landscape.”

The style, which was also widely billed as the “California bungalow” by architects such as Charles Sumner Greene and Henry Mather Greene, featured overhanging eaves, a low-slung gabled roof, and wide front porches framed by pedestal-like tapered columns. Material often included stone, rough-hewn wood, and stucco. Many homes have wide front porches across part of the front, supported by columns.

Information taken from Realtor Magazine, Architecture Coach column.

Craftsman

4/2 on Dill Ave- 184K

Architecture Coach: Bungalow

These narrow, rectangular one and one-half story houses originated in California during the 1880s as a reaction to the elaborate decoration of Victorian homes. The style then moved eastward to the Midwest in the early 20th century, where it remained popular until the Great Depression. Bungalows have low-pitched gabled or hipped roofs and small covered porches at the entry. The style became so popular that you could order a bungalow kit from Sears and Roebuck catalog. The name “bungalow” had its origins in India, where it indicated a small, thatched home.

Lived in and loved

The Beauty of a Bungalow by Architect Coach Linda Legner

Charming and practical, this architecture style inspires as much enthusiasm today as when introduced in the late 1800s.

So much more than mere shelter, bungalows symbolize homeownership. This all-American style was developed with convenience, economy, and affordability in mind so that anyone with a steady job could enjoy the satisfactions and respectability of a home to call their own.Always informal in elevation and plan, bungalows were built abundantly across the United States between 1890 and the mid-1900s, becoming so popular that companies like Sears, Roebuck & Co. and Montgomery Ward offered mail-order houses that were pre-cut in factories then shipped out for fabrication on site by local carpenters.

The very first bungalows appeared on the East Coast, but California quickly claimed the bungalow for itself—although it didn’t take long for this popular style to infiltrate the Midwest and make its way into every other region of the country.

Characteristics of a Bungalow

An offshoot of the Arts and Crafts movement, bungalow designs emphasize a horizontal link between the house and the land around it. The use of natural, local materials and colors also reinforce this home-earth relationship. Overall, bungalows project a picturesque and homey feeling, both artistic and practical at the same time.

You’ll recognize a bungalow by these features:

  • One or one-and-a-half stories
  • Low, sloping roof either gabled (front or side) or hipped, often with wide overhangs
  • Exposed roof structure (beams, rafters)
  • Exterior proportions balanced rather than symmetrical in arrangement
  • Modest front porch
  • A front stoop is a common element
  • Focus on a garden, even if small
  • Open, informal floor plan
  • Prominent hearth
  • Wood details inside
  • Built-in furniture common throughout the house

Variations of the Theme

The style morphs easily to adapt to regional tastes and building materials, making it a good fit for any geographical locale. A bungalow’s exterior might be brick, clapboard, board and batten, shingle, stucco, log, or stone depending upon taste and availability of materials in the region.

In California, it’s typical to see bungalows with Craftsman lines or in a Spanish Colonial motif. The mostly-brick Chicago bungalows, on the other hand, show off Prairie-style influences and a boxy adaptation to suit long, narrow city lots. Camp and Lodge styles using rough-hewn materials were common in the mountain areas of the East. Where Spanish Colonial Revival and Mission shine in the Southwest, Federal and Georgian Revival touches abound in the Washington, D.C., area.

It’s impossible to classify all stylistic variations of the bungalow. The very fact that so many exist testifies to the nation’s love affair with this cozy, comfortable housing stock.
The Inside Story

In an effort to maximize interior space, bungalows incorporate built-in furniture of all kinds: sideboards in dining rooms, cabinetry in kitchens, bookshelves that double as room dividers, window seats and benches wherever they could fit in. Oak serves as the primary material.

Interiors also feature a liberal use of wood for flooring, wainscoting, chair rails, plate rails, and box beams creating geometric ceiling patterns. Stained glass and leaded glass enliven windows, cabinet doors, and artisan light fixtures.

Fireplaces often take center stage in living rooms, reflecting the philosophy that hearth is the heart of the home. Wooden mantels top fireplace surrounds that might be of brick, stone, tiles, sometimes rustic boulders. Fireplaces can be arched or rectangular, and are frequently flanked by bookcases or cabinets. And, in more elaborate installations, benches or inglenooks were added to accommodate fireside chats and long, lazy reads.

Information taken from Realtor Magazine, Architecture Coach column.

Bungalow

3/2 Shirley Street, 184K