Energy Saving Dishwasher Tips

Home Maintenance Tip- Dishwashers
Most of the energy used by a dishwasher is for heating water. The Energy Guide label attached to new dishwashers estimates the annual power needed to run the appliance and heat the water based on natural gas and electricity costs.Dishwasher Tips

  • Check the manual that came with your dishwasher for the manufacturer’s recommendations on water temperature; many have internal heating elements that allow you to set the water heater in your home to a lower temperature (120°F).
  • Scrape, don’t rinse, large food pieces and bones from dishes. Soaking or prewashing is generally only recommended in cases of burned-on or dried-on food.
  • Be sure your dishwasher is full, but not overloaded, when you run it.
  • Avoid using the “rinse & hold” on your machine for just a few soiled dishes. It uses 3 to 7 gallons of hot water for each load.
  • Let your dishes air dry; if you don’t have an automatic air-dry switch, turn the control knob to “off” after the final rinse and prop the door open slightly so the dishes will dry faster.

Long-Term Savings Tip

  • When shopping for a new dishwasher, look for the ENERGY STAR label to find a dishwasher that uses less water and 41% less energy than required by federal standards.

Excerpted from U.S. Department of Energy.

How To Create A Rain Barrel

..this is what I need to do. A few of my neighbors have created some unbelievable systems and have big plans. Plans beyond just watering roses- but actually connecting them to their bathroom toliets  for ‘flush’ water…. I admire you guys. Right now, I just need to water my tomatoes before I have another failed crop.

The department of watershed has step by step instructions for creating one here:

http://www.atlantawatershed.org/rainbarrel/index.htm

I’m excited, maybe there is hope for my garden this year.

ATLANTA: City considers higher water bills

http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/printedition/2008/06/11/sewer.html

By David Bennett, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – Published on: 06/11/08

 

 

Two proposals to raise Atlanta’s water and sewer rates moved forward Tuesday.

One would boost rates 27.5 percent this year followed by three consecutive rate hikes at about 12 percent. The other would impose a 15 percent penalty to make up for water revenue the city has lost through conservation during the drought.

Both moved without a formal recommendation of support but will be considered by the council over the next 20 days as the panel tries to wrap up the fiscal year 2009 budget.

Water utility officials say the increases are needed to continue to pay for the bonds Atlanta is using for the $4 billion program to overhaul its aging water and sewer systems.

If the council approves the conservation penalty, utility officials say they can scale it back if the drought ends and water use returns to its pre-drought levels.

 

 

(Our city officials continue to ignore the cries of the people and make decisions that hurt….I’m very dismayed over the future of the low and middle income families living within the city of Atlanta…)

Atlanta is a money pit…

I was very disappointed when I saw the below article on creative loafing.  My water/sewer bill is already ridiculous! Now what??  Sheesh- people complain about how expensive it is to live in NY- to me, Atlanta is worse… aleast New Yorkers make comparable wages …..Can you tell right now that I’m not really feeling ATL?  Well, I’m not feeling ANY place that continues to hit me in my pocket!

Massive water/sewer rate hike may be on the way

April 25th, 2008 by Scott Henry in News

Atlanta residents already bracing for a potential tax hike may also be facing a sharp jump in their water and sewer bills.

Although the Department of Watershed Management won’t deliver its proposed budget to the City Council until May 1, a highly placed source in City Hall says the department is planning to ask for a dramatic 25-percent rate increase.

The department had recently sought to enact a “drought surcharge” to offset residents’ lower water usage – and thus lower water revenue – but was rebuffed by the Council.

“It seems unfair to ask people to conserve water and then penalize them for doing it,” says Councilwoman Clair Muller.

The presumption is that Watershed would simply roll the increase into its upcoming budget proposal, which was already anticipated to include higher rates to pay for the next round of sewer fixes. But Muller says the rumored 25-percent hike is much steeper than was expected – and is likely to inflame more controversy in a City Hall already grappling with a budget crisis.

If such a large increase in water rates is proposed, Muller says she will move to postpone future clean-water projects so the city can keep rates lower but still meet a federal consent order to repair its aging sewers.